Author Topic: The coming election  (Read 2436 times)

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #45 on: January 26, 2018, 09:07:22 PM »
Could Jersey be planning to import Indian and Chinese nationals to work in the Tech industry after Brexit?

I ask this after reading a tweet by top UK City fat cat Miles Cedric this week. Personally I have never heard of him but he is clearly a man of some considerable influence because he had high level meetings with leaders in Jersey and Guernsey this week. This tweet of his was quickly re-tweeted by HRH Senator Iain Gorst:

https://twitter.com/TCUKmiles/status/956443019238150144


What particularly intrigues me is a reply to that tweet made by none other than Wayne Gallichan, infamous for being one of the two civil servants at the centre of the JEP's South Africa flights investigation. He left Locate Jersey a year ago (see JEP report below) and is now working for a Fintech company called InfrasoftTech. By the by, he is also one of Jersey's most influential Israel lobbyists:

https://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2017/01/22/flight-cost-controversy-civil-servant-bows-out/


This is what Gallichan tweeted in reply to Cedric yesterday:

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Excellent presentation Miles and delighted to have shared a taxi with you. Interesting points discussed especially around future U.K. policy on Immigration for Indian/Chines talent in #Fintech #Regtech

So Gallichan is still important enough to be attending meetings, it would appear, with influential UK businessmen who have the ear of the Chief Minister. He is part of an influential circle of Jersey Tech kingpins that includes Jonathan Williams and Marcus Ferbrache at e-gov and Tony Moretta at Digital Jersey. Moretta's Digital Jersey are today holding a typically expensive PR event which is being attended by movers and shakers, including some of their fanboys in the States Assembly. Being very keen supporters of the Tech industry, Mezec's Reform Jersey are naturally attending today's junket, as witnessed by this excited tweet placed this morning:

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Outstanding Star Wars introduction at @DigitalJersey Annual Review this morning. But also some great speakers and lots of optimism about the future of the digital industry in Jersey.

https://twitter.com/ReformJersey/status/956827098903142400


It may also be a complete coincidence but Mezec last week lodged an amending proposition which would have the effect of preventing islanders from using the proposed new online petitions system unless they had first signed up to the Digital ID which Ferbrache and his team at e-gov are currently setting up at enormous cost to the taxpayer. It is believed that Mezec has lodged this wrecking amendment because the proposed PPC system would not allow people to participate in e-petitions if they are located outside of Jersey, based on their IP address - a restriction which seems absolutely reasonable given that it is aimed at Jersey residents only and not at the rest of the world. However, Ferbrache intends to allow persons outside of Jersey to sign up for a Jersey Digital ID. This would obviously include students studying in the UK and it is this group in particular that Mezec wants to be able to access e-petitions as they are the most likely to support e-petitions that Reform Jersey intends to lodge. You can read Mezec's proposition here:

http://www.statesassembly.gov.je/assemblypropositions/2017/p.123-2017amd.pdf


According to the PPC, who are bringing the e-petitions projet to the States, it will be up and running by this summer. However, that is unlikely to be the case with the Digital ID, which is only expecting 20% of islanders to voluntarily sign up in the first year in any case, rising to 40% by the end of 2019. So if Mezec's amendment wins, the vast majority of islanders will be prevented from lodging e-petitions this summer to voice their grievances at government policies, but it is also excellent evidence that Reform Jersey are active supporters of restricting the public's access to government services and interaction with government bodies unless they consent to sign up for a Digital ID. Amongst other needless invasions of our privacy, Ferbrache is planning to link the Digital ID to "credit reference agency data", so the government will be able to access the credit records of everyone with a Digital ID in order to verify where they are living in Jersey (it is not stated how or why this would apply to those holders of a Digital ID living outside of Jersey who will presumably be under no similar statutory obligation to let the government of Jersey know where they are living at all times).

Now I will end by returning to our person of interest, Wayne Gallichan. This week he also re-tweeted a very interesting article describing a system of ID card verification card that the Republic of Ireland has just introduced, which has already reached its target of more than 3 million sign ups by the end of 2017. I urge everyone to read it because it gives us an indication of what Ferbrache is probably planning with Jersey's Digital ID a year or two down the line. He says that "it will not be compulsory" but according to this article, it isn't compulsory to hold the Irish ID Card either. Here is an extract (article dated 22nd January 2018 by Michael Cross):

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In theory it is voluntary to obtain a card, but Irish Times columnist Karlin Lillington challenges the claim, saying that evidence is mounting that the cards are being treated as de facto national ID cards.

She referred to the state website welfare.ie, which says: “The card is now deemed necessary for a range of activities when an Irish resident interacts with the state. Not just to get social welfare benefits – as, surely, far fewer than 3 million adults access these – but to take a driver theory test, apply for a first-time or lost passport, submit citizenship applications, and to get “access to high value or personal online public services.”

http://www.ukauthority.com/news/7846/id-cards-ireland-goes-where-uk-feared-to-tread?utm_content=buffer312f6&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


I am personally convinced that the government of Jersey has already been persuaded to link payment of pensions and benefits to possession of a Digital ID but we won't be told this until some time after the election and I fear that it will just be thrust upon us in the form of Regulations lodged for States rubber-stamping, by which time it will be too late to do anything. I suspect they will somehow merge the existing Housing and Work registration card into a new photo ID card linked to the Digital ID, which will be essential to have in order to access government services or to interact in any way with civil servants.

Is any States Member voicing their dissent against these plans? Not likely!

Will the electorate be asking questions about it at the forthcoming hustings? No, of course not.

But if you have bothered to read this far then you are now a lot better informed about this serious threat to your freedom and privacy than you were at the start, so it is up to you to raise the matter whenever the candidates make themselves available for questions.

https://blog.gov.je/2018/01/26/towards-a-digital-id-part-14/


« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 11:07:59 PM by Jerry Gosselin »

Offline Fritz

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #46 on: January 27, 2018, 02:45:27 AM »
"Stupid is as stupid does", comes to mind when it comes to Jersey Politics and Politicians.

Offline boatyboy

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #47 on: January 27, 2018, 03:00:38 AM »

Excellent post Jerry although we may not agree on everything, I will need to read it again to gain the real detail of your post.

Until then, thanks for your painstaking research.

You again though have not answered my question, you don't like Reform but who would you suggest the people vote for, I suggest Higgins, Lamy, Le Fondre as a start ?

BB

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #48 on: January 28, 2018, 10:15:42 AM »
Excellent post Jerry although we may not agree on everything, I will need to read it again to gain the real detail of your post.

Until then, thanks for your painstaking research.

You again though have not answered my question, you don't like Reform but who would you suggest the people vote for, I suggest Higgins, Lamy, Le Fondre as a start ?

BB

If you had to push me I would say that Deputy John Le Fondre has shown in the past year that he is sometimes (but not very often) prepared to swim against the tide when most of his colleagues are too closed-minded to see the damage of the policies they espouse. An example would be his surprise decision to order that MORI poll which showed that the public are definitely not crying out for the type of electoral reform that so many States Members have spent more than a decade trying to force on us. In addition, his current brave and principled stance in the face of a biased and hysterical establishment media on the reform of the marriage law suggests that he is becoming too good at his job (this is my version of a compliment). Instead of just following the Zeitgeist, he is considering the wider implications on society of some of the controversial laws that his colleagues are quite happy to rubber stamp. That is a bit of a concern because he could find himself, metaphorically speaking, facing the same fate as Julius Caesar. There will be no actual knives used but he might find himself facing an internal Establishment coup in St Lawrence, similar to Pallett in St Brelade (although nobody but the brain dead will regret Pallett's political demise). The States Chamber is a place for the intellectually feeble, talkers rather than doers, followers rather than leaders. They get very jealous when a fellow club member shows them up for what they are, so John had better watch his back a bit more from now on.

However, I think the underlying tone of my last post above is that policy formation is completely out of the hands of ordinary islanders. It is now controlled by an elite group of highly-paid, well-educated but totally untouchable people who have the support of not only those in the executive but also those on the backbenchers, including Reform Jersey. The media are also fully compliant and the lawyers make sure never to publicly speak out against any policy on human or civil rights grounds.

I have already conceded in my own mind that no candidate of any political persuasion who is likely to stand in May's elections really shares my concerns and seriously wants to change things, so this suction of power away from the citizen will only intensify. This doesn't mean I'm encouraging people not to bother to vote, as there is already enough of this and nothing positive comes from it. Rather I am saying that those who do vote cannot possibly change the really big policies, many of which have already been arrogantly announced in the past few months.

In a proper democracy where the executive actually feared losing power, major policies would not suddenly be announced on a whim and rushed through the legislature just months before a general election. In a proper democracy the government of the day would have already tried to implement its major policies in its first year or so in power. Yet here in Jersey there is such arrogance in our government that they are effectively tying the hands of whatever politicians we choose to elect in May. That is why things such as the sudden overnight policy shift to a work permit system where even our fellow British citizens could be stopped from coming here based on an old spent conviction, the right to remove the organs of our newly-dead and offer them to whichever health service wants them, a 20 mph speed limit throughout St Helier backed up by (I predict) automatic number plate recognition and intensive CCTV everywhere, a steady increase in the number of Tech fatcats invited here on licences from countries all around the world thus pushing up rents and housing prices - and countless other controversial plans - will be completely unaffected by May's elections. You will just get a handful, maybe two handfuls if it is a particularly revolutionary year, of States Members leaving the House only to be replaced by new States Members who believe it is their duty to continue whatever it was that their predecessors were already working on.

The only real power that the voters possess is the right to vote negatively to remove certain States Members who they can no longer stomach. We have all known that Ozouf is one of these chosen hate figures, which is why logic dictates that if he wants to remain in the House he must either switch to Constable of St Saviour or run again for a Deputy's seat, probably either in St Helier No. 3/4 or one of the St Saviour seats, where he would have little trouble sweeping aside political nonentities like Doublet, Lewis or MacDonald. The problem is that by voting negatively, we ignore the qualities (or lack of them) of whoever ousts our chosen hate figure. So you have your little moment of joy on election night but then the candidate who ousted your hate figure then sets out to follow his predessor's same policies! A system like this is just corrupt and hopeless.

So my prediction is this: some old sailors will be forced out and some new, keen sailor cadets will replace them but the direction and ultimate destination of this political ferry has already been decided and I fear that for many it is going to be an increasingly rough trip across the seas...

Offline shortport

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #49 on: January 28, 2018, 09:22:44 PM »
Couldn't agree more,i'm sure that is exactly how it will pan out.

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: YAY! PAUL ROUTIER FINALLY OUSTED FROM POWER!
« Reply #50 on: February 15, 2018, 12:36:05 AM »
A rather miserable, cold winter's day suddenly just got a lot brighter for thousands of islanders who have been waiting to hear this news for years ...

SENATOR PAUL ROUTIER TO RETIRE FROM POLITICS!


Go celebrate people!  :)

https://www.bailiwickexpress.com/jsy/news/states-longest-serving-member-steps-down-after-nearly-quarter-century/?t=i#.WoR_SHbLhdg



Offline boatyboy

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #51 on: February 15, 2018, 01:23:24 AM »


Yep that is a cause for a small celebration rather like the contribution Paul Routier has made to the quality of lives of islanders over the last 20 years the word being small.

If you wish to look it up on Hansard, feel free, regarding questions of cost and the secret trial Routier at his best. Not so secret of course after John Hemmings spilt the beans in the UK Parliament naming all of Emma Martins proxy witnesses including a couple of petty convicted criminals.

Asked how much the  secret trial cost the taxpayer by  " scared of no one pitbull" ex Deputy Trevor Pitman in the Assembly, Routier stood there for twenty minutes telling amused states members it was a secret.

Yes the trial maybe said Deputy Pitman but it has to be paid for so how much has it cost the taxpayers so far ? The trial is secret burbled Routier again and again by the Senator and assistant minister doing exactly as he is told as usual by his handlers ……………………….   as the states members smiled in cheep amusement.

bb

 

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #52 on: February 15, 2018, 01:49:18 AM »
I don't want to spoil the rejoicing but he's bound to turn up in another Quango or similar job after the election. It just occurred to me that if the 3rd Gorst administration ends the Bailiff's dual role, some government insider will be nominated by Gorst as the new Speaker of the States. If the job can be given to a non-States Member then might it possibly be Routier?

I hope this is not the reason that he's agreed to step down today. Judging by the equivalent role in the House of Commons, whoever gets it will be on expenses and perks galore - one of the cushiest jobs in politics. They will certainly have a much more attractive pay package than a normal States Member. Please God let me be wrong on this one!  :-\

Even worse thought:

Philip Ozouf: Speaker of the States!  :o
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 01:51:34 AM by Jerry Gosselin »

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: YAY! PAUL ROUTIER FINALLY OUSTED FROM POWER!
« Reply #53 on: February 15, 2018, 07:45:37 PM »
Routier is quoted by ITV News Channel TV as saying he has decided to "take up other challenges":

http://www.itv.com/news/channel/2018-02-15/jerseys-father-of-the-house-not-standing-again/

|| QUANGO ALERT ||

|| QUANGO ALERT ||

Offline boatyboy

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #54 on: February 16, 2018, 02:10:52 AM »
In a moral and decent island, ex civil servants and ex  politicians would not be allowed to sit on Quango's or employment boards.

How can these people be called independent when they have being employed by the Government, and as an ex civil servant still receiving money by way of a pension and then paid again by the Government on a board or quango. An ex politician may have close ties with serving Government ministers or deputies etc.

Stink's

BB.

 
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 04:22:48 PM by boatyboy »

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: The coming election
« Reply #55 on: February 16, 2018, 07:14:43 AM »
It's terribly sad and disheartening to note how island politics has changed immeasurably for the worst since Routier was first elected in 1993. I remember it well as I was an elector in his district and met him and some of the other candidates.

I knew even then that he would end up on the Establishment side but he came across as a bit harmless and I never foresaw that he would be the man who would be responsible for the gross deception that was hiding behind the Income Support Law. People reading this won't understand what sort of deception I mean (and doubtless they don't care) but there was (and still is) highly controversial political intent hidden deep within some apparently minor and uncontroversial articles of that Law. The whole point of it is that the general hoi polloi never get to know what the real hidden meaning of these articles is (and doubtless don't care). They were so uncontroversial that Minister Routier barely said anything about them by way of explanation when he proposed the Law to the States in 2006 and, naturally, a compliant Chamber never queried any of it and just said "pour" to everything.

A decade later I discovered some of the real, underlying meaning of that deeply-hidden content. It gives future Assemblies the power to make subordinate legislation that directly conflicts with the express words of the 2006 statute. So the 2006 Assembly read the terms of what was proposed, saw nothing controversial with it and voted to make it law. They presented an apparently uncontroversial law to the Privy Council who duly gave it Royal Assent in 2007. Now it turns out that one of those uncontroversial articles gives the States the power, as I said,  to make subordinate legislation (thus not requiring Royal Assent) that can directly conflict with the express words included in the 2006 Law - and without even having to actually amend what the 2006 Law says. It is a very clever deception and means that certain elements of laws that are highly controversial and which might not be welcomed by the Privy Council can simply be left out of the main body of the law that is sent to London. It then gets Royal Assent and then some time later, using the clauses with hidden content, the States can then rubber-stamp the more controversial aspects in the form of Regulations, away from prying London eyes. Even more concerning is the fact that nearly identically-worded clauses are also included in many other major Jersey Laws. So you think that a certain law assures you certain particular rights because such and such a term is clearly stated in the body of the principal legislation which can normally only be amended with the approval of the Privy Council, but in reality a Minister could just rely on these ambiguously-worded clauses with hidden content to lodge Regulations which directly conflict with the parent law - and get away with it!

Either Mr Routier was informed by the Law Officers of these hidden powers in the Law back in 2006 and kept quiet about it, or, just as worrying I think, he possibly didn't even know about them himself and maybe wasn't even made aware of them by the Law Officers. None of us will live to find out, as I believe States legal advice is exempt under the FOI Law for 100 years. The former option suggests that he, as an elected official, perhaps knew a bit more about the hidden powers in the Law than he mentioned in the Assembly. The latter suggests the Law Officers didn't fully make him aware of all the hidden powers that they had carefully sewn into the fabric of the articles. Either way, it says nothing encouraging at all about the standard of legislating and governing in this island whose present leaders want full independence from the UK to write whatever laws they want without Privy Council interference.

And there was me back in 1993 thinking that this amiable chap couldn't do much harm...  ::) 
 
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 07:20:03 AM by Jerry Gosselin »