Author Topic: Less modern hotels are suffering  (Read 2924 times)

debumblebee

  • Guest
Less modern hotels are suffering
« on: April 04, 2009, 12:17:51 PM »
An interesting one here from CTV online, apparent the influx of modern hotels being built is havig an effect on old hotels.  I must admit though, that when I go away I prefer to stay in a place with more modern facilities.  What do you think?  Do they only have themselves to blame or is this just another excuse to convert more of them into flats?

http://www.channelonline.tv/channelonline%5Fjerseynews/DisplayArticle.asp?ID=405012

Less modern hotels are suffering

A surge in 4 star rated accommodation in Jersey is forcing the closure of less modern hotels.

Watersedge Hotel owner Robert Behan says that despite a million pound investment over the last nine years, his Bouley Bay accommodation, along with other 1950's style hotels, simply can't compete.

The Planning Department are considering proposals to convert the hotel into apartments.

Offline Dylan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1672
  • HELP!
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2009, 12:23:07 PM »
Trouble is all these "modern" Hotels are just Eurobeige in colour. everything is the same. Very soon it will be recognised for what it is - tat.
!dereggub si draobyek ym kniht I

Offline Dundee

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 902
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2009, 01:01:05 PM »
Longueville Manor old and brown and a very pleasant place to be in, the food is first class (from my one and only visit!)

Places like Les Arches, Watersedge, Plemont, Portlet all had stunning views, so one has to question what the future of Jersey is.

One thing I would have liked to have seen implemented time past was some sort of service level for staff similar to the French scheme of time served and trained operatives that they are trying to or have scrapped there. Sadly many hotels employed cheap staff with no experience little language skills and kept them in poor accommodation. Kitchens in these places were often lacking and used tinned and frozen products instead of some first class local produce.

The same goes for modern building firms very few locals and apprentices to be found on sites especially around the waterfront. Instead cheaper untrained unqualified staff are the Jersey way. If politicians and business have no faith in the local workforce the future is bleak in my view.

Offline White Knight

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 402
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2009, 02:17:44 PM »
Take a good look at the way the new hotels are being buildt. Very easy to convert into apartments!!!!  ( or flats, which ever word you would sooner )

Offline Sarah Ferguson

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 290
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2009, 04:29:08 PM »
The market is changing and the expectations of visitors are changing too.  20 years ago the single rooms not ensuite were the first rooms to sell. 10 years ago they couldn't be sold - in fact they remained unoccupied for much of the season. 

In other words it is essential that you continually improve and upgrade facilities if you want to sell rooms.  Snag is that it does limit the amount which you can take out of the business as dividends.  It is also difficult to upgrade if you have purchased the hotel with bank loans as they require paying before you can think of upgrading.

No easy answer to the problem I'm afraid.

Offline Dundee

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 902
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2009, 06:04:06 PM »

No easy answer to the problem I'm afraid.

 yes there is ~ you put a States member on your board who likes to stick his finger in as a many pies as he can, get housing to give you a site at a knockdown price, build an extra floor and a half and get it through retrospectively (when others have to take down their garden fences!), get a public area for al fresco eating, and have your surroundings made into a paved area from the public purse.

Then public meetings are held in said hotel at great cost to the taxpayer when more economic venues are available.

rogueelement

  • Guest
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2009, 06:34:39 PM »
Given that people have a problem with 100,000 residents being here , why would they/we wish to make that problem worse with a million tourists as we used to have?
Tourism is dead , gone ,defunct, get over it, there may be niche markets for tandem cyclists but that is about it.Jersey is great , but so are a lot of other places and they are a lot cheaper to get to and to stay at.Tough , thats life. If we really want tourists it is quite simple , Instead of chucking £25,million away on a tourism dept , we have an arrangement with a carrier , Boat or Plane or both and we give away 200,000 free return tickets , I,m pretty sure we could bring that in at under £20,million.
There you go £5, million saved , 200,000 more tourists ,Tourism is saved!
I,ll take my usual consultancy fee of 10% of the saving.

Offline moot

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1149
  • Gender: Male
Re: Less modern hotels are suffering
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2009, 08:35:23 PM »
Given that people have a problem with 100,000 residents being here , why would they/we wish to make that problem worse with a million tourists as we used to have?
Tourism is dead , gone ,defunct, get over it, there may be niche markets for tandem cyclists but that is about it.Jersey is great , but so are a lot of other places and they are a lot cheaper to get to and to stay at.Tough , thats life. If we really want tourists it is quite simple , Instead of chucking £25,million away on a tourism dept , we have an arrangement with a carrier , Boat or Plane or both and we give away 200,000 free return tickets , I,m pretty sure we could bring that in at under £20,million.
There you go £5, million saved , 200,000 more tourists ,Tourism is saved!
I,ll take my usual consultancy fee of 10% of the saving.

I agree with that Sparty !
There will always be a tourism industry here but a small one. What will stay big is the Tourism department with waffling, high salaried, waiting for early retirement, chiefs like David de Carteret.
What will he blame this year ? Recession, Easter being late, weather, airlines etc Never his own pompous complacency