Author Topic: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.  (Read 29226 times)

Offline Fritz

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #120 on: March 31, 2016, 03:15:22 AM »
Simple answer is Jersey will disappear off the map once global financial laws are enforced re tax evasion/avoidance etc. And it will happen sooner rather than later.
Unfortunately, when it does, we will have about 150,000+ mouths to feed and people to house.
I,m glad I,m getting on a bit.
Wouldn,t like to be around when folk are back to eating seagull for Sunday Lunch.

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #121 on: April 03, 2016, 09:59:26 PM »
Think the Jersey government is doing a great job (apart from the very highest earners increasingly having to subsidise everyone else by paying far too much tax and also too much red tape for businesses to overcome, like the Employment Law)? Hate benefit claimants, employees, unions and the like? Love the 12 parishes and their fantabulous honorary system? Want to keep the Constables in the States forever? Do you have previous experience as a journalist and want to share your political views with the rest of the island? Want to climb the social ladder in Jersey and mix with the elite few?

Tick yes to all of the above and Lord Filleul may have a job waiting for you at his Bullshit Express. More details here:

https://twitter.com/jamesfilleul/status/712656570568544257

No lefties need bother applying. No decent journalists need bother either.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 10:07:01 PM by Jerry Gosselin »

Offline shortport

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #122 on: April 03, 2016, 11:23:25 PM »
I thought the Bailiwick Express might have been an improvement on the JEP,but alas I was wrong.
A while back there was a story about Gorst to which I left a negative though polite comment.
In true JEP style they didn't post it.Same old bullshit as you say.
No wonder none of their stories have any comments now.

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #123 on: April 08, 2016, 07:54:12 PM »
Typical of the chummy atmosphere that has always existed in Jersey between the media and States Members, I learned today that a group of them actually play football together in their spare time. The 'Manager' of the team is none other than Deputy Murray 'Children in Need' :-[ Norton, which explains so much, doesn't it? Now if you were a local journo playing on that team, would you be fully motivated to investigate and report political news stories which might possibly show the 'gaffer' of your own footie team in a negative light? I think you might expect to face a prolonged spell on the substitute's bench if you did.

Another team member is Senator Lyndon Farnham. Well no surprises there either. While he was still a backbencher of no importance, Farnham was so notorious for being constantly invited to appear on local TV news (particularly ITV Channel where he obviously had very close contacts) that I tried to log some of those appearances on a dedicated PJ thread. Here is one such message by me highlighting ITV Channel's blatant promotion of Farnham during the run-up to the October 2014 election:

http://planetjersey.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=3369.msg59360#msg59360

Of course this sporting fraternization is nothing completely new. We already knew that a group of them used to play cricket matches every summer. However, if my memory is correct, they had separate teams in those days for the media and States Members. Perhaps it is symbolic of the way that their relationship has got closer over the past few years that they now play together quite openly on the same team without fear of adverse public comment. It would be very handy to know the individual names of the members of this current media footie team so that we can look back in 2018 and note how many of them went on to get elected to the States on the back of their high-profile media status and then subsequently got invited to join Norton, Mac, Moore etc. on the Jersey Government's front benches supporting the policies that have been implemented in the last few years...  ::)

The next obvious question to ask is whether the female members of the States are playing similar team games in their spare time with local female journalists who might possibly fancy the idea of adding a £50k States Members' salary to their income whilst still being able to continue doing part-time freelance media and PR work. Anyone for netball?
 

Offline Fritz

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #124 on: April 09, 2016, 02:37:27 AM »
Even worse in the Construction game.(States depts TTS etc included). There are so many half-wits bouncing from company to company, job to job just because they are members off the old ,"Egg-chasing", club. Worse than the bliddy masons when it comes to looking after their own despite their inadequacies. 

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: ITV reporting - is it worth no licence fee?
« Reply #125 on: July 11, 2016, 06:00:21 PM »
As I write this, 13 out of the last 14 tweets on the ITV News Channel TV Twitter page either concern the result of last night's European Championship soccer final or - even more predictably - "Guernsey's Heather Watson">:(

https://twitter.com/itvchanneltv


The latter, to my knowledge, hasn't actually lived in Guernsey for many years, unless she still uses it for beneficial tax domicile purposes (nearly all the top tennis players use tax havens to avoid paying taxes on their global earnings in the countries which they nominally represent). She and her tennis partner also had more than their fair share of luck during the past week because two of their victories were due to their opponents not actually turning up to contest their matches!

The soccer match had only limited interest in this country because no home countries were involved. Even in the host country of France, only one private TV station actually screened the match live, despite France being one of the participants. The French state-owned TV stations did not broadcast this tired, yawn-making spectacle.

The 2011 Jersey census reported that 8.2% of the island population declared themselves to be of "Portuguese/Madeiran" ethnicity. Logically that means 91.8% of the local population are either born liars or aren't Portuguese/Madeiran and therefore had no particularly strong interest in last night's tedious soccer event. Many of those 91.8% presumably wanted their children to have a peaceful night's sleep before school and not be kept awake by the sounds of car horns until well after midnight. Many of them will have been disappointed.

It would be nice if ITV News journalists based in Jersey could start reflecting these local realities in their hopelessly unrepresentative, Walter Mitty-esque coverage.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2016, 06:27:10 PM by Jerry Gosselin »

Offline shortport

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #126 on: July 12, 2016, 01:01:14 AM »
Don't hold your breath,immigrants either mega rich or minimum wage are more important to this government than any concerns of the local inhabitants.

Offline Fritz

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #127 on: July 12, 2016, 01:53:43 AM »
Think you will find,(If you do any research), that most European countries, (And any little off-shoot islands), are full of immigrants, and descendants of immigrants.
Its called, bringing in fresh blood. (Even the Royal family do it when their preferred in-breeding system produces undesirable results).
Any of you remember,(What we immigrants called), "The sky-watcher", walking the streets of St. Helier in the early 80.s? 
The guy was the product of so much in-breeding that his face was practically on the top of his head!!

Offline boatyboy

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #128 on: February 27, 2017, 04:24:13 PM »

Mr Fixer is out to grab your money from a private company yes it is folks that is why it is called the British Broadcasting CORPORATION. Income through licence fee £3.5 Billion.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4262202/BBC-s-TV-licence-bullies-exposed.html

" Accused officials of snooping through windows and forcing their way into homes"


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4262202/BBC-s-TV-licence-bullies-exposed.html

See YOU tube videos regarding your rights and the BBC. THey are not allowed over your threshold for example without your permission.

BB


Offline boatyboy

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #129 on: February 28, 2017, 04:50:39 AM »
 
Have a few spare minutes so folks enjoy, you are Innocent until proven guilty.

I am confused as to why the police turn up to support a private company in trying to extract money, the company being the British Broadcasting CORPORATION

Be polite but do not get bullied.

How it is done.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfHRhXW1hno

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-Fn4BiHekk

BB

Offline boatyboy

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #130 on: March 08, 2017, 04:56:34 PM »


The Shame of BBC TV licencing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PUwBbe4f4k

Funny old life in it ?  They get £3,700,000,000 in licence fee's yes £3.7 Billion. Plus another £1.3 Billion from commercial activity Total £5 Billion.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/04/14/how-does-the-bbc-spend-its-5bn-in-licence-fee-money/

BB
 

Offline Jerry Gosselin

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Re: BBC reporting in Jersey is it worth the licence fee.
« Reply #131 on: November 10, 2017, 08:35:58 AM »
I have to report this as it is a blatant example of a BBC Jersey 'journalist' (I use the term very loosely) using sly, underhand tactics to make sure that the public could not adversely comment on a news article in which he had allowed Deputy Sam Mezec to claim that he was the subject of a "targeted campaign" by an "organised group" after a Freedom of Information request revealed that Mezec had 3 complaints against him upheld by PPC in November 2015 and was asked to remove some posts from Facebook.

First - the underhand tactics:

It is usual procedure for the BBC to tweet a link to a local news report like this but despite very careful searching on two of the BBC Jersey twitter pages, I cannot find any mention of this article about Mezec. Conveniently, this prevents anyone posting adverse comments about Mezec on Twitter. The report itself contains a link on the BBC Local Live web page enabling a Twitter user to re-tweet it to their followers. However, the very long length of the re-tweet link effectively inhibits any Twitter user from posting anything other than very short comments about it when they initially re-tweet it. Here is the re-tweet link so you can see for yourself the problem:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/world-europe-jersey-41861397?ns_mchannel=social&ns_source=twitter&ns_campaign=bbc_live&ns_linkname=5a044af7e4b02d7b3a1c882a%26Deputy%20says%20upheld%20complaints%20%27part%20of%20an%20intimidation%20attempt%27%26&ns_fee=0#post_5a044af7e4b02d7b3a1c882a via @BBCNews

I also note that the report hasn't been published on BBC Jersey's Facebook page either. Even more unusually, the report hasn't been mentioned by Reform Jersey on its own Twitter page. If it had, Twitter users could then have commented on it.

Now about the 'journalist' who wrote the report, Ryan Morrison. In the past he has posted tweets on his own Twitter page which have openly supported some Reform Jersey policies, such as the ill-fated Mezec-Lewis electoral reform proposals, which is hardly encouraging from an impartiality perspective.

Second- the report itself:

The really objectionable thing about the structure of this report is that it appears to seek to create a casual link between, on the one hand, Mezec's claims that he has been the target of this mysterious organised group which he has reported to the police, and on the other hand, "a series of similarly worded requests for information on prominent opposition politicians including Deputy Judy Martin and Deputy Mike Higgins" (quoting Ryan Morrison's report).

Morrison goes on to say:

Quote
The questions in the FoI request, from an anonymous source, asked about how many propositions and amendments they had brought, whether they were successful, and if they referred to their own parishes.

The main problem with this lazy attempt at linkage is that Freedom of Information requests are supposed to be anonymous.  ::) Therefore all requests are from 'an anonymous source', whether they're asking questions that annoy Mezec and Morrison or not! If the subject of a request (in this case, Mezec) was capable of finding out who posted the request then then this would be a serious breach of confidentiality by the FOI Unit.

Presuming that the FOI Unit has not committed such a serious breach in this case, how on earth would Mezec be able to prove that the person who posted this request is connected to the mysterious organised group that he claims has been targeting him? The answer is that he can't and Morrison should therefore not have crafted his biased report in such a way as to give the impression that a link exists between the two.

It is also not stated what became of Mezec's complaints to the police. Did the complaints have enough substance for charges to be brought against anyone? If no charges were brought then that rather weakens Mezec's case.

Finally, the FOI Law contains an exemption allowing a request to be identified as part of a campaign. Therefore whether or not these series of FOI requests about backbenchers are coming from the same individual (or group of individuals), the States already has the means of not answering them if it suspects they are part of a campaign. So far the FOI Unit has not raised this exemption in respect of these requests about various backbenchers. This rather weakens the implication in Morrison's report that the requests are linked to the earlier 'targeted campaign' that Mezec complained about.

Nobody should be intimidated from making any FOI request because of a perceived fear that they might later be reported to the police by a politician who might be embarrassed by the response to that request. If anyone wants to ask for details about the political history of any backbench politician then they should be perfectly free to do so, in the same way that they are equally free to ask for similar details about the 40+ government supporters in the Assembly. If Mezec can't accept this level of public enquiry about him then he needs to take up a different profession.