Author Topic: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?  (Read 3331 times)

Online boatyboy

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You would think that after the low bench mark the public have set the public administration at, after the golden ( not worth the money ) handshake given to two civil servants that the public sector would tread very carefully regarding public opinion.

Non of  it. Third partys are brought and paid for using taxpayers money and reports  kept secret, like the latest BDO Alto report £64,000 and redacted Wiltshire, useless because information is redacted giving little balance. The people of Jersey deserve better than this, far better.


JEP

EDUCATION executives have refused to release ‘value for money’ reviews into each of the Island’s secondary schools.

A request by the JEP under the States’ transparency code for the reports has been turned down by Education, which says that the reviews are exempt from disclosure because they contain information given to the department by schools on the condition that it would not be revealed.


Best and to the point comment.

Pleb

Posted June 5, 2011 at 7:33 pm

In the public life, secrecy is the friend of the incompetent.

http://www.thisisjersey.com/2011/06/04/education-no-to-call-for-details-of-reviews/

What a charade, ultimately the clear responsibility of the I love secret's Chief Minister, and his Council who allow this carry on.

BB
« Last Edit: June 06, 2011, 04:02:30 PM by boatyboy »

Online boatyboy

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2011, 04:53:04 PM »

Imagine your boss says come in when you like take longer for lunch, would we do this as humans, of course we would. If the report we had to do had no time limit or the machinery that needed to be fixed could be repaired when we felt like then why bother.

This is generally the norm but grant you there are individuals that are disciplined and motivated by personality but rarely if ever in children.

The place that is Wales, stopped proper lessons about ten years for primary school ages, also scrapping result tables for schools and pupils. My personal view is life is wonderful but easy it ain’t. So are checks and balances good for children in education yes IMO, it also enables teachers to observe weakness of subject and give extra / special help so the child may catch up.

I read some time back about the UK’s most successful maths teacher that had found ingenious and interesting ways to attract his students imagination and interest. His classe’s pass marks year on year were up in the nineties. His school was obviously open and transparent when it came exam results. Would this happen in Jersey with the education department present regime ?or is it a case of  not wanting to work to hard to attain excellence ?

The article from the Sunday Mail on Wales endemic educational failure

SATs tests have also been ditched and a controversial new approach to the teaching of three to seven-year-olds – the Foundation Phase – has been introduced. The current generation of Welsh 15-year-olds, the first to have been educated under the new system, have been outperformed by pupils in every region in England, including the North East, Yorkshire and Humberside, similar economically and socially to Wales.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2008225/Exam-results-plummet-school-league-tables-abolished.html#comments

SCHOOL league tables are counter-productive and can breed poor performances among pupils and teachers, according to the Education Minister.
Deputy James Reed told a Scrutiny Panel yesterday that he did not believe Jersey’s schools should be compared ‘like for like’ when it came to GCSE results because it could lead underperforming schools to lose confidence.

http://www.thisisjersey.com/2011/03/26/school-league-tables-counter-productive/

PUBLISHING school league tables and exam results has a divisive effect and should not be practised in future, according to Education Minister James Reed.

http://www.thisisjersey.com/2011/03/19/league-tables-have-divisive-effect/

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Offline Dundee

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2011, 11:35:52 PM »
Hear hear, in this case give more support to the private sector which is outdoing the public sector, not try to penalize it like Deputy Reed is attempting.

Online Fritz

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2011, 02:56:42 AM »
We do not need ,"League Tables".
All we have to do is ensure that all children can read, write and count when they leave primary school.
When they go on to secondary school, their relative skills and interests can be honed and directed as necessary.

In my honest opinion, there is too much emphasis on, "Enjoyable educational experience", these days.
Primary school teachers,(The whole system?), are ,quite simply, not up to scratch when it comes to teaching the basics.
"Teaching", is no longer a vocation. It has become, "An easy number", for folk who could barely spell, "O level", and want a job with lots of holidays.

Tragic.

Offline Chevalier Blanc

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2011, 03:45:31 PM »
So what do you all think about James Reed on his interview and walk off from BBC TV?
I think it is shameful!   Why did he not want to answer the question put to him?
Open government, more transparency. I would like to know and hear how they can answer this subject after Reed's ignorant display when asked a very fair intelligent sensible question. There again i may have answered the question myself after all it was an intelligent question being put to a dumbo!

Offline David Rotherham

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2011, 11:04:13 PM »
Fritz, who are your contacts in the teaching profession, who have led you to such a low opinion of them? Apart from being a parent of current schoolchildren, I am the husband of a schoolteacher, too, so I get to find out as much as a lay outsider is ever going to about what is going on.
Jersey education is now several years into a new approach called Critical Skills, aimed at preparing pupils for life and work far more effectively than the late 20th Century idea of modern did. Even on this very forum you will find rants about the quality of school leavers, and that is now being tackled as a priority. To turn it all into a competition to top league tables will corrupt the process into mere cramming for tests in the bad old manner, and unleash another generation of kids who know when the Battle of Agincourt was without looking it up on Wikipedia, but are utterly flummoxed by everyday tasks.
And teachers work damn hard in not only delivering lessons, but the behind the scenes preparation. I don't think I gave it a thought when I was a schoolboy, but now I get to see behind the curtain, I see it is not a cushy number at all

Online Fritz

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2011, 01:55:10 AM »
I have a 22yr old, "Apprentice",(Through back to work scheme), who cannot count. According to his CV, he did very well in achieving the standards set by local schools.

Online boatyboy

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2014, 02:57:36 PM »

The start of this thread from June of 2011 highlights several issues with the way education has been managed. Is it not incredible that a clause placed by a states department civil servant on tax payer funded reports, that they are written on the understanding they are for the departments eyes only and are not allowed outside of the department, which makes a complete folly of accountability. Little or no accountability leads to a culture of laziness, slack work practice and a feeling of being untouchable.

This was amplified by the head of Education's Mr Mario Lundy's refusal ( just retired on a big pension, more reward for failure ) when  " asked "  by states members and parents faced with large increases in school fees regarding how many- non - teaching staff meaning administration and support staff are employed at education. He refused to give an answer, and was allowed by Ministers - not to answer. Reader you are seeing the outcome of a weak Council of Ministers allowing this culture.

Notice below in the latest statement by a choir of industry leaders almost three and a half years later ( of poor education for many children but not all ) Senator Paul Routier yet again, desperate to been seen by the public and business leaders on stage, makes a typical meaningless statement.

Quote:

" Senator Paul Routier also spoke out, suggesting that senior politicians were committed to improving the situation "

End.

If he had any sort of backbone, he ( and other weak states members ) would have demanded answers to questions, three and a half years ago, by a States employee working at education.

The final point I want to make is throwing more money at any business or states department is no guarantee of success if the culture or management is weak, inefficient or uncaring.

The old labour Government in the UK threw billions more to improve the NHS several years ago. When a report was ordered on the improvements attained after a period of two years. It was discovered to the dismay of the labour health minister that the money had been absorbed by higher pay and an increase of management posts resulting in minor improvements to the NHS service.


Bailiwick Express [ statements are selective please read full article ]

But ministers at the IoD debate made it clear that there is frustration over the lack of reform at the Education department, and they are not prepared to put up with "business as usual".

The first speaker at last night’s event was Mark Boleat, who started the ball rolling by saying that Jersey should be ashamed of its education system.

His comments opened the floodgates as the focus shifted quickly to education – John Mills, the former chief civil servant, who was instrumental in forcing the Education department to publicly reveal exam results that showed some individual schools were faring far worse than their overall statistics suggested five years ago, said that there was a real issue.

“Compared to London or the South East, schools in Jersey just aren’t performing,” he said.

http://www.bailiwickexpress.com/jsy/news/education-finally-pushed-timetable/?t=i#.VCZhZEu9vwI

Boatyboy
« Last Edit: September 27, 2014, 06:19:52 PM by boatyboy »

Online boatyboy

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Re: Education executives want secrecy and supported by Ministers ?
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2014, 06:48:37 PM »

MINISTER PAT RYAN RESPONDS.

JEP.

Schools are not failing, says Minister

Jersey schools are not failing and criticisms levelled by business leaders of the education system are largely unfair and inaccurate, according to Education Minister Patrick Ryan.

http://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2014/09/27/schools-are-not-failing-says-minister/

Good for you Minister Ryan, supporting Jerseys' education system. Three questions need answering,

1)   Will you now order the release of " All " reports on education into the public domain so parents are able to share the information ?

2)  Would you be kind enough to also put into the public domain, the real figures on how many teaching and back room non teaching staff are employed by the education department in 2014 compared to 2010, in light of extra user pays charges levied against parents ?

3) If not why not ?


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