Author Topic: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government  (Read 16736 times)

Online boatyboy

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2014, 09:33:36 PM »
Senator Breckon and no doubt others have put much work into this proposition. The reasons he is against it are highlighted below and will ring a lot of bells with the public and probably the twenty two states members that voted against the formation of the States of Jersey Development Company in the first place.

http://planetjersey.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3291.0.html

Easy to read and a win for commonsense if the proposal is carried on Tuesday.


STATES OF JERSEY
ESPLANADE QUARTER DEVELOPMENTS: APPROVAL BY THE STATES
Lodged au Greffe on 10th February 2014 by Senator A. Breckon

STATES GREFFE

2014 Price code: B P.15

PROPOSITION

THE STATES are asked to decide whether they are of opinion ?

to request the Minister for Treasury and Resources to give directions to the States of Jersey Development Company Limited in accordance with Article 22(a) of the Articles of Association of the company that none of the new developments currently proposed for the area known as the Esplanade Quarter, St. Helier should be progressed until the details of the proposed developments have been presented to the States by the Minister for Treasury and Resources and endorsed by the Assembly.

SENATOR A. BRECKON

Page - 2

P.15/2014

REPORT

When the States Assembly were “sold” the Esplanade Quarter Masterplan (P.60/2008) we were told a number of things –

• That it incorporates a diverse range of uses and creates a lively residential and business area with plenty of space and facilities for visitors and locals to enjoy at leisure.

• A boutique hotel and self-catering apartments will represent a significant investment in high quality accommodation for Jersey’s tourism industry and the Waterfront will present a new focus for visitors to the Island. The new public squares, open tree-lined boulevards and landscaped open spaces will be accessible and enjoyable by the young and old. Pedestrian comfort and easy accessibility are crucial aspects of the Masterplan.

• Locals and visitors alike, of all ages, will be able to enjoy the new shops, cafés, restaurants and bars. The Masterplan envisages that such new retail space will complement, not compete with, the existing town and bring life and vitality to the area. There will be shops providing for the needs of residents and office workers in the waterfront area and specialist shopping likely to appeal to visitors.

• The Masterplan provides for nearly 400 new apartments for local residents. New homes will help to meet Jersey’s ongoing housing needs and relieve pressures to open up Greenfield sites for development. Their location will encourage people to walk or cycle to work, adding to the area’s sense of community and not to the increasing pressures on the Island’s roads.

• The Masterplan includes high quality office space for Jersey’s thriving business community. Office space of the floor plate size and quality envisaged by the Masterplan is currently scarce in the Island, despite there being demand for space of this type from a number of the largest financial and professional services operations in Jersey. Evidence from local surveyors gathered on behalf of the Developer (referred to below) confirmed that there were requirements for 2007 – 2009 for 560,000–620,000 square feet from 14 large occupiers for modern “Category A” offices in Jersey. Such evidence reported the sea-change that Jersey is experiencing in occupational requirements following the consolidation of a number of substantial financial sector companies. As a result, the quality and size of the current office stock is not suitable. Demand for modern “Category A” offices in Jersey is expected to increase (50,000–100,000 square feet per annum) over the next few years. The Masterplan’s proposals will therefore satisfy the operating needs of the most demanding investors and occupiers in St. Helier and help meet Jersey’s evolving business accommodation needs.

• The Masterplan proposes that a section of La Route de la Libération (from a point between Kensington Place and Patriotic Street to the current eastern end of the existing underpass) is lowered into a subterranean tunnel. The section in actual tunnel will be from the end of Gloucester Street to the eastern end of the existing underpass. The remaining sections will be the approach slopes to the tunnel.

P.15/2014

Page - 3

• When the development is fully occupied it will provide an estimated 57 million additional rateable quarters. As the total contribution from the Island-wide rate is fixed, the charge per quarter will reduce proportionately, in this way reducing the cost of both domestic and commercial rates. Based on 2007 values, the increase in quarters would equate to a saving of approximately £540,000 in the existing Island-wide rates. Therefore, if States general revenues needed to increase to fund the tunnel from 2012, this could be achieved by offsetting the reduction in the Island-wide rate with an increase in other income-generating measures with minimal, if any, increase to the overall cost to business or households.

• The development will connect the existing town with St. Helier’s attractive harbour area, an area for recreation, relaxation and increasingly an area in which people live. It will gradually result in some businesses moving to the Esplanade Quarter from the existing town, and this migration will act as a catalyst for future investment in and the regeneration and reinvigoration of some of the older and run-down parts of St. Helier. The Masterplan envisages that regeneration of parts of the existing town will provide opportunities for development of residential accommodation of all types, contributing significantly to the Island’s ongoing housing needs. It is consistent with the “Strategy for the Future Development and Regeneration of St.Helier” published as part of the EDAW report in March 2007.

• The Masterplan sets out standards of excellence for design and provides strict guidelines for building layout, heights and materials to ensure the development is constructed to the highest standard. It demands that each component of the development is built to the highest environmental standards and the materials used sustainable and climate-proof. It proposes that buildings will be set around colonnaded squares to provide shelter from wind and rain and places for people to sit and enjoy the public spaces. Granite will be an important feature, and the existing seawall will be incorporated in the development. The Minister for Planning and Environment has already appointed the Waterfront Design Group, which comprises various local experts, to carry out an independent review of the Masterplan, and local experts will continue to be appointed throughout the development to ensure the Esplanade Quarter is designed to reflect the high standards of Jersey’s architectural heritage, albeit in a contemporary context.

• The Esplanade Quarter is expected to take approximately 7 (not more than 10) years to complete. The proposed layout of the Esplanade Quarter as set out in the Masterplan lends itself well to development over such a period. The area will be developed in phases and the undeveloped areas will, until their respective development, be areas of landscaped attractive open space for the Public to enjoy.

• In accordance with the States Economic Growth Plan, the Esplanade Quarter development will help Jersey meet its objectives of economic growth with low inflation. Development in accordance with the Masterplan will generate new investment for the retail, leisure, tourism and finance industries, at the same time releasing existing pressures on residential and office space thereby preventing overheating.

Page - 4

P.15/2014

• It is proposed that the States endorse the intention of the Minister for Planning and Environment to adopt the Masterplan for the Esplanade Quarter as an agreed development framework for the Esplanade Quarter. The Minister for Planning and Environment will then assess any applications for development of the area against the Masterplan and require that any such development is in accordance with the requirements of the Masterplan

• The Masterplan provides a robust framework in which the Esplanade Quarter can be successfully and sustainably developed. It will enable the provision of a boost to tourism, high quality office space, some of the planned-for additional housing units, and many other important public amenities and infrastructure projects agreed with the Minister for Planning and Environment. This proposition has the ability to move the development of the remaining area of the Waterfront forward as never before and deliver substantial benefits to the Island. The Council of Ministers therefore commends the proposition strongly to the States.

FINANCIAL AND MANPOWER IMPLICATIONS

The financial implications are set out above and there are no manpower implications for the States arising out of this proposition.
______________________________________________________

The above are all direct quotes from the Report attached to P.60/2008, as is the section below.
______________________________________________________

SUMMARY OF THE FINANCIAL TERMS DEVELOPMENT OF ESPLANADE QUARTER
OF THE PROPOSED

In return for such sub-lease(s) Harcourt Developments Limited (or a wholly-owned subsidiary of Harcourt Developments Limited) (the “Developer”) will make payments of £50 million to the Board, build a mixed-use development on the site in accordance with the finalised masterplan, design codes and development agreement and deliver significant infrastructure benefits. The payments will be made in 3 tranches over an 8 year period. These payments are guaranteed either from a bank of good financial standing or by way of an acceptably rated insurance bond. They are based on independent valuations and, backed by the guarantees, represent no risk to the States or the Board.
The proposed development includes significant new public open spaces and squares that will be paid for (and maintained) by the Developer as part of the overall scheme. Combined, these public areas are 5 times the size of the Royal Square and include a main square and a covered winter garden (both of which are comparable in size to the Royal Square).

In addition, the Developer will carry out and meet the cost of associated infrastructure works. These works include sinking a section of La Route de la Libération below ground and constructing an underground tunnel; installing traffic management improvements; providing appropriate support to public transport services; and reinstating and enhancing Les Jardins de la Mer. The costs associated with the infrastructure works have been ascribed a value of £45 million and the Developer will

P.15/2014

Page - 5

provide a financial guarantee in this sum in order to fund the completion of such works in the event that the Developer defaults. Such infrastructure works will greatly ease pressures on the immediate surrounding residential and commercial areas and benefit the Island as a whole. The future maintenance of the infrastructure will be undertaken as usual on behalf of the Minister for Transport and Technical Services at an estimated long-term cost of £500,000 per annum. This cost will be met from States general revenues and, if necessary, income generated by increases to offset savings to business and households resulting from associated reductions to the Island-wide rate.

If the values at practical completions exceed certain trigger values as set out in the development agreement, the Board will receive a 33% share of the increased value in the form of overage payments. Assuming inflation at 4% per annum is reflected in capital values, these additional sums could total £25 million, but are subject to future market conditions and consequently the overages are not guaranteed.
In summary, the total value the States will receive in monetary terms is a minimum of £50 million excluding the overage payments or £75 million including the potential overage payments, together with substantial non-monetary benefits by virtue of the infrastructure works that the Developer will carry out and pay for, which have been ascribed a value of £45 million.
_______________________________________________________

So, as can be seen by the above, we are now in an entirely different situation to when these proposals were sold to the States

• The Developer is no more!

• The money guaranteed has gone!

• The Waterfront Enterprise Board (now the States of Jersey Development Company (SoJDC) has become the Developer, not a third party as envisaged.

• Public money – £13 million is being loaned towards the underground car park.

• Future details of how the Masterplan will be rolled out and funded are NOT known.


• The effects on St. Helier are unknown.

• The timescale appears to have been moved from a maximum of 10 years to maybe 20 years.

• Will the sinking of the road still happen: if yes, how and by whom will it be funded?

• What is the demand for office space, retail, restaurants, etc. in the next 10/20 years?

• Will the States be relocating its central office-based functions to the site, e.g. Planning and Cyril Le Marquand House, as this is estimated to take up 25% of the space?


Page - 6

P.15/2014

I know the answers to some of the above, but not all; and I do not want what may be considered sensitive commercial information, like how much a potential tenant may be per square foot. However, I would like, and I think the States and the general public deserve, more information.

There are significant knock-on effects of this development that are of significant public interest that should be both revealed and debated by the States. It is not good enough to be shrouded in secrecy. Or to have a presentation with sausage rolls and cheese sandwiches and be told how wonderful it’s going to be – I believe we need to be told the whole truth.

The Minister for Treasury and Resources may contend that all the details have already been made available to the public by way of the standard Planning application procedure and all the objections have been taken account of.
This may sound reasonable to States Members, but critical to this is what is meant by ‘details’ and ‘the public’.

Most importantly, ‘details’ have indeed been submitted in the 2 individual Planning Applications, but on a piecemeal basis and not linked to the Esplanade Quarter development as a whole. They cover only a small part of the whole development area, and differ in terms of both fundamental layout and phasing to the architects’ plans originally shown to and agreed by the States.
Furthermore, individual Planning Applications in the context of the overall development of the site constitute only part of the ‘details’. No financial or other relevant ancillary details have been provided to Members to support the development. This is not a private development project for which the individual or company concerned needs to obtain the funding, etc. about which the public at large will need to have no concerns. The concerns here are of a public nature and need to be presented accordingly as part of the whole package for development.

At this point, although the Minister for Treasury and Resources may claim that to provide such details would disclose ‘commercially sensitive information’, I don’t believe that is the case here. Indeed, SoJDC has been set up separately as a limited company just so that it wouldn't need to involve the States in its day-to-day operations. This to a lay-person and States Member might sound very plausible, but it is in fact nonsense. Of course when one is negotiating rental agreements with third parties (e.g.rental rates per square foot, special deals, etc.) such matters need to be confidential. The States has no need to go into or the time to be party to such details. However, it should know what the overall budgets are and, more importantly in this case, what long-term annual financial plans are in terms of overall capital to be employed (States loans, third party loans and overdrafts), net operating income and expenditure, profits generated, dividends paid to the Treasury, net profits and/or losses and planned cash-flows. None of the above need contain ‘commercially sensitive information’. We should also be fully aware of the risks, in this case the ‘what if’ alternatives (e.g. cost of delays in phasing due to non-occupancy, etc.), since the whole project could be riddled with these (e.g. finding tenants for rentable space).

The “public interest” in this affair, in my opinion, is much more than a couple of Planning Applications. The very material sums that will have to be laid out in order to bring in potential future returns and the financial risks attached to this are equally of public interest. Also, there appears to be a need to produce an Economic Development

P.15/2014

Page – 7 continued as a history but can be found here.

http://www.statesassembly.gov.je/pages/search.aspx?query=P.15%2f2014

Boatyboy
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 03:36:45 AM by boatyboy »

Online boatyboy

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2014, 05:37:58 PM »
The Maria Miller story rumbles on being told by an accredited media that wants the truth. Such a din over a set of common decent principles and a smallish sum of just under £6,000 ( which she has agreed to pay back ) agreed by a second committee called the standards committee made up of ten politicians and three lay members.

The good news is the press are informing the public by holding Mrs Miller to account, and that is admirable.

In Jersey one or several lose millions of pounds of taxpayers money by not hedging the Euro ( or easily taking out insurance ) when purchasing an incinerator from a French Company, again losing possible millions over the Lime Grove Fiasco and also recent history tells us collapsing the Harcourt development because of deeply flawed and inaccurate information misleading the Jersey Government in the full states assembly.

Then we have a certain Mr Bill Ogley who just happens to be the retired head of the civil service, who while in charge blatantly lied over an email involving police dossiers and was involved in the suspension of Jerseys decorated and honourable Chief of police Mr Graham Power. He was proved to be the secretive second man after he took out an injunction against Jerseys one and only newspaper to try to stop the information becoming public.

There are many more examples of unaccountability in public office, but you get the idea.

Not one person resigns or loses their position or is properly held to account in Jersey, yet they have they audacity to tell the public and anyone that will listen that Jersey is a democracy and well run.

Mrs Miller would be far happier working here.

Boatyboy.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/conservative/10747333/Maria-Miller-must-go-over-expenses-claims-says-senior-minister.html

http://www.thisisjersey.com/2009/01/29/suspension-notes-deputy-in-call-for-answers/

In the States yesterday States chief executive Bill Ogley was unmasked as being the ‘second individual’ named in suspended police chief Graham Power’s memo about the secret police dossiers.

http://www.thisisjersey.com/2009/07/01/39340/

http://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2012/03/20/revealed-why-bill-ogley-resigned/
« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 10:23:44 PM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2014, 11:44:05 PM »
Honesty, integrity, truthfulness, trust and boring old but essential transparency, covered in Ex States member Daniel Wimberly’s talk at the excellent Church house lunch time seminars.

While his views on States spending are very different to my own, he is a man of integrity and a sad loss to the Government of  Jersey.

After watching all the videos linked below, the last one (  a mere 6.58 minutes ) really placed the spotlight on why many of the political elite are not trusted, as was confirmed in a recent Statistics Department Annual Social Survey 2013.

The ex Deputy brought a proposition to debate honesty in the assembly ( where the debate will be placed on record,  Hansard ) um  let’s not !

Thanks to the meeting organisers, speaker Daniel Wimberly and the Tom Gruchy  blog who get all credit.

http://tomgruchy.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/daniel-wimberley-at-chow-talk-3-march.html

The publics view of states members ( obviously not all members ) and by default Jersey’s administration

Page 16.

http://www.gov.je/SiteCollectionDocuments/Government%20and%20administration/R%20JASS2013%2020131122%20SU.pdf

Thanks to Ian Evans.

http://therightofreply.blogspot.co.uk/2011/05/islanders-give-their-damning-verdict-on.html

BB.


« Last Edit: April 07, 2014, 12:03:51 AM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2014, 11:49:49 PM »


Guernsey Press.

GUERNSEY’S law firms donated just £600 towards an expensive portrait of former Bailiff Sir Geoffrey Rowland – leaving taxpayers to foot most of the bill of more than £13,000, it has been revealed.

http://guernseypress.com/news/2014/04/29/lawyers-pay-just-600-towards-bailiffs-portrait/

Open transparent and a public interest story after all they sponsored the purchase.

JEP

A PAINTING by a Jersey artist commissioned to mark the 350th anniversary of the gift of the Royal Mace to the Island from King Charles II was unveiled in the Old Library this week.

http://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/2013/11/30/artists-brush-with-history/02037693_cropped/

Zero.

bb

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #34 on: June 19, 2014, 06:12:52 PM »

The members of the Government the good people of Jersey      " do not “     deserve, because such incompetence was never on view when voting these people into the States.

The time to get them out is fast approaching, use your vote in four months time to remove the dross, dead wood and self interest merchants.

Part of article, 

Quote:

Well, yes I'm afraid it can because though Health Minister Pryke was doing her usual best to waffle, time waste and plead ignorance to avoid giving an answer that might come back to haunt her I can confirm here that Deputy Pryke herself sat through a FOUR HOUR meeting at the Hospital which I had arranged on behalf of the complainant where all of this was spelt out for her in most graphic detail.

http://thebaldtruthjersey.blogspot.co.uk

Boatyboy.

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #35 on: August 13, 2014, 04:38:24 PM »
Minister Health Anne Prkye suggested in her narrow field of vision to join with the Isle of Man in an effort to collaborate to regulate the  Jersey Health service and we them. Little did she obviously know, that that the IoM sets its sights far higher involving bench marks used by the NHS since 1948 with a free at delivery system. Jersey doctors charge so it is not free at point of delivery. Another example of the IoM being closer to the NHS model.

However Jersey could learn much about democracy and transparency from the IoM. when we find out the Police Chief is to be questioned in public about his budget.

Readers are informed:

The meetings are being organised by the Police Consultative Forum (PCF), an independent body made up of community representatives that seeks the views of the public regarding policing and the prevention of crime.

http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/isle-of-man-news/opportunity-to-grill-minister-and-police-chief-1-6778834

What this indicated to me, is that all around us in an effort to be available to public scrutiny there are TV, Radio and public meetings ( in the IoM ) whereby politicians and senior figures are held accountable and asked questions that directly affect the lives of the local community.

How many times have you watched a question time debate on ITV Channel with the Ministers that spend islanders’ money and make laws put under pressure to explain them. How many times do BBC have apposing politicians like the well informed Deputy Higgins having intelligent verbal sparing matches with Ministers who duck questions in the States and yet want our vote come the election, but cannot be bothered or refuse to answer important questions on decisions they have signed off.

They are let of very lightly in Jersey by a very light weight media that has plenty of scope to improve.

Suggested topics for a regular Jersey hour long question time ( with live audience and questioners ) once a week.

1) What action is taken against cyber bullying and how many convictions have the Jersey police made in the last three years. Do they care given recent blog postings on a pregnant wife and her husband being bullied?

2) Visits to China appear frequent by troops of politicians and their civil servants, what up lift has Jersey had from the visits and how much have they cost the taxpayer.

3) Are there plans to adopt a new property tax.

4) Why are hospital waiting lists so long?

5) Do the panel feel that Jersey is human rights compliant having a Speaker who controls the assembly, and then sits as Judge in court ?

6) Do the panel feel that Jersey is a functioning democracy and if so give examples ?

7) Why are quango's being set up to run states departments ?

8) Why is Jersey heading for a black hole financially and why does the treasurer wish to keep topping up the rainy day fund of over £600 million ?

That’s enough, there is a vanload of other questions outstanding, yours are different to mine and other peoples. The biggest disturbing question is, why, in a so called democracy are real and meaningful questions - not- being asked of politicians coming up to an election by the public in open forum staged and covered by the media.

BBC Question Time in the UK is a very successful programme.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006t1q9

Any politician not wanting to appear would leave themselves open to heavy public criticism.

It may be that few politicians for all their bravado feel confident in answering the public , and even fewer understand the word accountable.

BB.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 05:06:52 PM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2014, 04:47:26 AM »
                                                               Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government

The question is clear reader, if you and I were part of a responsible body of elected people, and we were lied to by a colleague, which clearly lead to an injustice, how would we deal with the situation ? Protect the culprit or do whatever it takes to protect the integrity of the body we represent ?

Deputy Mike Higgins found out that Andrew Lewis lied to the states ? Was Deputy Lewis under oath of office ? Deputy Higgins asked for the states to debate the facts in open parliament but they voted not to, and locked the doors yet again to have another secret in camera discussion. What were they so afraid of having everything in the public domain and recorded ? You will  never  see it on Hansard but will probably be able to smell it.

The facts would have either decided that yes indeed Jersey's Government had been badly deceived or it had not. What were they really afraid of, being implicated as accessories, or just incompetent in the hunt for the truth or worse did not want to know, or for you to know ?

This note has been prompted for foreign readers by this blog post, voters in St Helier district 3/4 will be very interested.

The Man Who Sabotaged the Rule-of-Law
By Illegally Suspending the Police Chief –
Then Lied to the Jersey Parliament about it.


http://freespeechoffshore.nl/stuartsyvretblog/andrew-lewis-a-liar-and-a-crook/

Boatyboy
« Last Edit: October 13, 2014, 07:05:14 AM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2015, 01:51:17 PM »

Quote:

Citizenfour has won the Oscar for best documentary, for its director Laura Poitras, editor Mathilde Bonnefoy and producer Dirk Wilutzky.

“The disclosures of Edward Snowden don’t only expose a threat to our privacy but to our democracy itself. When the decisions that rule us are taken in secret we lose the power to control and govern ourselves.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/feb/23/edward-snowden-documentary-citizenfour-wins-oscar

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #38 on: April 22, 2015, 08:49:03 PM »
Just for a minute, imagine you are a states member. A member that cares, a member that was pleased and thankful to be voted in a member that wants to achieve good and be part of something that improves Jersey and peoples lives

So fellow states member for the ( length of this note ) , here we are back in July 2014 listening quite closely to the treasury minister telling us that, Jersey has a problem with a deficit, changes are required but a gentle handling of the tiller is all that is needed. If the states can save 2% then that will be a step in the right direction. Of course half of any savings will be returned back to those departments therefore 1% in reality.

We are realists, Jersey is just an island, a wee little tiddly island in the big scheme of world events, but we obviously feel the ripples or sometimes the breaking wave when events like the ordered closing down of the low value full-fillment industry. This clearly means we are not masters of our own destiny in the bigger picture, but must be accurate indeed prudent with the tools we possess.

The ex treasury minister in his usual eloquent and professional style pleads, informs, and convinces us,  because of the considered figures of Mr Jollies economics policy panel, that Jersey just needs to be careful reducing departmental spending, but not on circles on country roads, or lending vast millions to the SOJ Development Company in a property development gamble to build a car park  (and six office blocks) to replace one car park that exists or the long awaited police station, retaining the old one of course.

As a states member we are convinced and vote for the medium term strategy as he waves around with glee and a smile on his face saying this is what the public expect from us prudence and diligence, his usual rhetoric with other ministers nodding in agreement, it is July 2014 and the weather is warm.

Then we find just five and a half months later we have been sold a stuffed parrot, we have been deceived hook line and sinker. The treasury has all the indicators, in July the seventh month of the year, it knew, less was being paid into the revenue, it new through it's connection with the statistics department and all the other economic advisors that a £31 million pound black hole was optimistic. If it did not know, then there is clearly a credibility issue with the whole of the States economic monitoring apparatus. If in such disarray it must be obvious that if you don’t know your basic figures, there is no such thing a sensible balanced budget only a guessing game ?

“ We are were we are “ in the famous words of Frank Walker who oversaw, as Chief Minister the collapse of Jersey’s largest ever development deal, and has just been granted a borrowing facility of £250 million, as the quango he sits on, now runs the housing department at arms length from the government.

Where are we now really then fellow states members ? In shock I hope but not in denial ? Lets be realistic, a mistaken forecast of 10% or even 20% taking Jersey up from £31 to a £37 million black hole may be reasonable, but from £31 to £130 is far beyond any joke, and clearly means that as an honorable states member we are having the urine taken out of us, or worse. How can certain ministers or departments be trusted with this carry on.

BB
« Last Edit: April 23, 2015, 01:56:29 AM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #39 on: April 23, 2015, 04:42:27 PM »

Counciler Jim Harker, leader of Northamptonshire Council, said,


The traditional model of local Government “ not only no longer works financially but doesn’t meet the needs of citizens.


Council sheds 97% of staff to save money.

Also Norfolk is downsizing it’s public sector.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-31544256

And Norfolk.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/norfolk-county-council-plans-3000-job-cuts-2116927.html?origin=internalSearch

It could of course be argued that by transferring housing, post office, Milk Board, tourism and harbour and airport to quangos that  the States of Jersey are indeed going private. Which then begs the question why have two hundred brand new public sector jobs been created in the last two years ?

Why also are the wage packets so heavy in the Jersey public sector when unlike the UK’s 40% tax on earnings that kicks in on earnings over £33,000 Jersey stays at £20% ? Is that not in itself an uplift in the amount you are  ‘ Allowed  “ to keep.

Is the Bailiffs job sitting listening to politicians and being a judge, really worth the £305,000 a year paid by the taxpayer when the UK prime minister receives £147,000 remember the 40%.

Again as a person being out of work several times in my life it is not a good place to be, and I wish it on no person. However is it not reasonable to want less stealth and other taxes increase on the less well off pensioners and young families just to pay exorbitant wages to empire building clipboard managers with strange titles, that only exist in tax funded Governments. Can someone please explain why civil servants get bonuses in a non commercial non competitive environment ?

Boatyboy.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2015, 04:44:57 PM by boatyboy »

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #40 on: May 07, 2015, 03:21:47 PM »

We never did find out why the ex Treasurer resigned a week before ex Treasury Minister Phillip Ozouf's accounts were published.

Quote:

A report into financial management of Jersey's States has found there is a 'lack of transparency' and the current financial planning system is not 'fit for purpose.'

The Comptroller and Auditor General, Karen McConnell, says her investigation shows there needs to be 'cultural changes' in order for reform to happen.

End.

One does wonder if this feisty lady will be offered another three year contract when her's expires or will she go the way of the Treasurer  and her predecessor ?

http://www.itv.com/news/channel/topic/jersey-states/

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Online boatyboy

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #41 on: June 17, 2015, 04:13:49 PM »
The good people of Jersey have made their voices perfectely clear, that they support the Finance industry, that they support the building of the International Finance centre as long as proper checks and balances have been run over the whole development in an objective and professional way, the best bet being the Corporate scrutiny panel, who's report is close to completion.

No says the Government after telling many and various lies. The main one being the promise about full tenancy as grade  "A " office space is so desperately needed. Yet after years they sign a firm already working in Jersey, paying tax, and only taking 16.5% of the building.

What to do as a disgruntled but legal abiding citizen. Recycled from the comments section of Bailiwick Express.

Posted by    david forde    on    Jun 16th, 2015

These incompetents use that in the hope the public swallow the story. They should be held accountable!

Posted by    June OKeeffe    on    Jun 16th, 2015

This is a message to the public, in future do not support, give assistance to, opinionate or assist the states in any way - why - they dont care about the people of Jersey and tougher tactics must be found

Posted by    nigel pearce    on    Jun 16th, 2015

Will the 'millions' we lose by delaying be more or less than the millions we shall lose by going ahead?
The public of Jersey have spoken. The States' members should listen to their wishes, not just to the voices of those with financial interests.
Posted by    Simon Dodkins    on    Jun 16th, 2015

I do hope all those who voted in favour of this disaster have their new careers mapped out. I cannot imagine a single one of them being voted back in the next time they actually have to listen to us at election time. This is a disgusting display of the lack of willingness to listen to the public. They tell us if the development is stopping Jersey will be seen as an unreliable partner. So tell me, how will going ahead with the development look in respect to the governance of Jersey? How poorly will Jersey look to the outside world with respect to its elected officials actually representing the people? How will Jersey look when it is saddled with (another) white elephant?

Posted by    Jon Needham    on    Jun 17th, 2015

A sad day where democracy has not had it's say. The Minister will ultimately bare the responsibility and be accountable. Yes the plan has in origins in 2002 but the world is a different place since 2008. More particularly the world of finance is demonstrably different.

Posted by    Davey West    on    Jun 17th, 2015

June OKeeffe above is correct and we as family have discussed this. It is obvious that the Ministers and other politicians have their own personal agendas, and care nothing for working islanders. We have just sent back the latest social review, and suggest that they fill it in themselves as the states don't listen. Any correspondence from the states and St Helier Town Hall, will be sent without the post code or department being named.

All legal, let us see what happens in the near future when the rest of the population becomes unhelpful. Oh yes, we will pay our St Helier rates and all accounts at the end of the allowed time. Certainly not when the bill arrives as we normally do. Silly politicians.

http://www.bailiwickexpress.com/jsy/news/ministers-say-waterfront-must-go-ahead-despite-protests/

AND

An interesting and honest interview on how the situation has morphed into a bigger story about dictatorship by Deputy Tadier, well worth a listen.

http://mtadier.blogspot.co.uk

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Offline Chevalier Blanc

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2015, 05:56:28 PM »
It was obvious that the last audit general left because she would not put her name to ozouf's financial report.
Now if she left on personal grounds then no need to pay out a golden handshake. So to keep her mouth shut pay her £350,000+.
So gorst says that was in her contract, well if the next person who comes in leaves after judt one month she/he can get £350,000+ payout.
No where in the world are you pay to resign on personal grounds only if you are pushed for bad service or in this case not put your name to a report full of lies. We now know the report was false and instead of £35m in the red we are £135m+ this is what ozouf tried to cover up before the elections and the ministers went along with it.
Next elections they MUST be voted oput!

Online boatyboy

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #43 on: June 20, 2015, 06:14:19 AM »


An honest opinion by Sam Mezec.

Regardless of anyone's views on whether we need to build these offices or not, it is completely reasonable to say that when it would only take a few weeks to finish that review, things could stand to be put on hold so we know all questions are answered before the public takes on potentially tens of millions of pounds of risk.
But two will be a surprise if you are one of those who voted for them based on what they told SOS Jersey before they were elected.

Both Deputy Murray Norton and Deputy Peter McLinton when asked if they supported offices being built on the Esplanade said "no".

http://sammezec.blogspot.co.uk

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Offline man in the street

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Re: Accountabilty and transparancy, the hallmarks of good Government
« Reply #44 on: June 20, 2015, 05:26:32 PM »
Well we know who the yes people are.
I knew norton would be. A yes man.
And hoped that peter mac  would turned out better :-[