Author Topic: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?  (Read 17900 times)

Offline danrok

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2009, 01:37:05 AM »
The BBC is also a commercial venture.  We pay for it directly, whereas we pay for other news sites indirectly by buying the products advertised.

The BBC spent 5.05% of it's £3.49bn revenue on websites last year, so that's £176.2 million on websites every year.

I have no idea how many staff are involved. I doubt that there are any exact figures, because they don't just use their own staff, some work is contracted out.

But, my point is that the BBC website doesn't just provide news, there's all kinds of content on there.  The trivia isn't just limited to local BBC pages.

For example, there are food recipes:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/

Suppose you had invested much time and money in a food & recipe based website, and your website took a nose dive, because you can't compete with the BBC?  How would you feel about that?

Do we really want a single corporation dominating every topic on the internet?

The bigger the BBC's web presence becomes, the smaller the rest of the internet will become.

Offline Ashley

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2009, 12:02:36 PM »
Which suits me fine as I like the fact that I can get so much info from the BBC. 

They're not commercial in the sense that they're hoping to profit from anything.  Which is good because when they're talking about something they're not trying to selling it. Which means you can view their content and be totally relaxed about what you're viewing.

Their radio pisses all over the competition and so does their TV. They set the standards for media so thank *whoever* that they're so good with their site too.  I honestly would not love the internet as much as I do if I didn't have the BBC to rely on.  It would be a never-ending depressing crap hole full of shallow corporations trying to be appealing so they can seperate you from your money. Makes me ill to even think of it.

Offline Calimachon

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2009, 04:50:56 PM »
Only a fool and his money are easily parted!
TOMORROW (Noun) = A mystical land where 99% of all human productivity, motivation an achievement is stored

Offline Ashley

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2009, 05:44:12 PM »
That's very insightful, Cali.  ;)

Offline boatyboy

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2009, 05:01:57 PM »
As with many islanders I watched the skill full BBC reporters at work on the Panorama programme.

The question is was it a fair and reasonable report? And should we pat the BBC on the back, or was it just sensationalism of the worst kind.

Firstly I admit to being biased. Banking as it was, served its purpose as a lender to those wishing to improve themselves, (myself included), and a safe place for any money we have. Until they got greedy very greedy, now they try and rip your hand off if they see a pound note in it.

I understand that Jerseys JFC and others have been working hard to make the island whiter than white in the big scheme of things and I suggest have done a good job in a complicated diverse international industry. They have made Jersey as best as can be in the arena.

However the banks through their greed and gambling, caused an economic meltdown which as we know will take decades to repair. Tangled in this mess are ordinary people lives.

The BBC was right to focus on the figures. Big banks are not lending to small business and the banks are not honouring their part of the bargain with the English government when they have been bailed out by the taxpayers. It's almost back to business as usual.

In comes the BBC, and well done to them, yes it was over the top, yes it was rather corny (swag) however most of the report rang very true with the man / women in the street

For me it was a true reflection of a Banking a business that shows no respect, or humility. No apology, well Ok Fred the shred did, and left with over seven million pounds plus very large pension.

Well done BBC saying what the people really think, going to the top (Mandelson), more please. Next time BBC please mention how charges have rocketed for cards, mortgages and other services, with the lowest base rate ever. I suggest we will not have to wait to long for the truth.   

BB
 
« Last Edit: September 22, 2009, 05:07:11 PM by boatyboy »

Offline Ashley

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2009, 06:04:22 PM »
As with many islanders I watched the skill full BBC reporters at work on the Panorama programme.

The question is was it a fair and reasonable report? And should we pat the BBC on the back, or was it just sensationalism of the worst kind.

Firstly I admit to being biased. Banking as it was, served its purpose as a lender to those wishing to improve themselves, (myself included), and a safe place for any money we have. Until they got greedy very greedy, now they try and rip your hand off if they see a pound note in it.

I understand that Jerseys JFC and others have been working hard to make the island whiter than white in the big scheme of things and I suggest have done a good job in a complicated diverse international industry. They have made Jersey as best as can be in the arena.

However the banks through their greed and gambling, caused an economic meltdown which as we know will take decades to repair. Tangled in this mess are ordinary people lives.

The BBC was right to focus on the figures. Big banks are not lending to small business and the banks are not honouring their part of the bargain with the English government when they have been bailed out by the taxpayers. It's almost back to business as usual.

In comes the BBC, and well done to them, yes it was over the top, yes it was rather corny (swag) however most of the report rang very true with the man / women in the street

For me it was a true reflection of a Banking a business that shows no respect, or humility. No apology, well Ok Fred the shred did, and left with over seven million pounds plus very large pension.

Well done BBC saying what the people really think, going to the top (Mandelson), more please. Next time BBC please mention how charges have rocketed for cards, mortgages and other services, with the lowest base rate ever. I suggest we will not have to wait to long for the truth.   

BB
 



It was one of the shittest things I've seen on tele for a long time.  It was on for what seemed like ages - nothing was actually achieved - the whole show was for nothing.

I do wish these morons would stop going on about bonuses.  It's boring. Yes, some of the big bosses perhaps shouldn't be getting millions - that makes sense.  The problem is that it filters down to people at me level who don't get paid that much, don't get overtime and rely on the bonus to some extent to get by.  The banks are now using the 'public outcry' to sting their stuff.  It's not on really.

Offline danrok

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2009, 12:07:20 AM »
Let's just face up to the fact that banks have off-shore branches for one reason only.  It could not be any more obvious.

Offline Ashley

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2009, 10:06:05 AM »
Let's just face up to the fact that banks have off-shore branches for one reason only.  It could not be any more obvious.

That was obviously the original reason.  Now Jersey banks have evolved into sophisticated wealth generators, who are world leaders in their field - not only in wealth management, but also in customer service and satisfaction.  It would be ridiculously small minded to assume that wealthy people only use Jersey banks to avoid tax.  They use them in the same way as they use expensive hotels - for the service, reliability, reputation and added value.

It's also worth mentioning thats, as has already been stated - it's up to the individuals to declare their tax position - not the banks.

Offline boatyboy

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #38 on: September 23, 2009, 01:00:16 PM »
To quote you if I may Ashley

for the service, reliability, reputation and added value.

THEN

By Robert Lea
Last updated at 2:25 PM on 20th October 2008

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/article-1079100/A-glimmer-hope-City-Libor-continues-fall.html#ixzz0Rvc1AnDP

A tentative thaw in the frozen money markets was being called in the City today as interbank lending rates continued to fall, and appetite for investment appeared to be trickling back into stock markets.
Libor, the benchmark three-month sterling lending rate between banks in London, was at 6.11635%, down 4.5 basis points from the previous 6.16%.

NOW.

Editor's commentary: The important three-month sterling Libor rate fell from 0.573% to 0.566%, announced on Tuesday, 22 September.

The daily falls gathered pace in late June and early June, coming down by two points a day at one point. The falls have slowed in September with Libor's convergence with the UK bank rate of 0.5% looking imminent.

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/libor

Are the Banks passing on this fall in inter-bank borrowing, actually yes they are increasing their service charges on just about everything from fixed rate morgages to credit cards to millions of customers.

BB

Sorry Mods wrong thread.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2009, 03:10:53 PM by boatyboy »

Offline danrok

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #39 on: September 23, 2009, 11:00:24 PM »
That was obviously the original reason.  Now Jersey banks have evolved into sophisticated wealth generators, who are world leaders in their field - not only in wealth management, but also in customer service and satisfaction.  It would be ridiculously small minded to assume that wealthy people only use Jersey banks to avoid tax.  They use them in the same way as they use expensive hotels - for the service, reliability, reputation and added value.

It's also worth mentioning thats, as has already been stated - it's up to the individuals to declare their tax position - not the banks.

Absolutely none of that provides any good reason for these banks to have branches located off-shore. 

Quality of service can be provided by any one of 1000s of branches in the UK.

Also, what is a "sophisticated wealth generator"?

Offline Ashley

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #40 on: September 24, 2009, 10:06:02 AM »
Absolutely none of that provides any good reason for these banks to have branches located off-shore. 

Quality of service can be provided by any one of 1000s of branches in the UK.

Also, what is a "sophisticated wealth generator"?

I don't think you're aware of how wealth management banks really work over here.   If you're rich and you want a nice suit, you go to Saville Row. If you're rich and you want a car, you maybe get a Rolls Royce. If you're rich and you want someone to look after your money for you, you don't stick it in HSBC Earling Broadway branch - you put it in a bank in Jersey where the people have a world renound reputation for specialist banking services.  Jersey punches way above it's weight in this field. It's actually something that locals should be proud of.  Unfortunately, because there's a few bad apples, the whole bunch gets wrongly labelled.  It's the same branding all child care workers sex offenders because of HdlG.  Hardly fair.  Maybe people in the industry over here are quite rightly proud of what they do. They shouldn't have accusing fingers pointed at them by an ignorant crowd of do-gooders.

A 'sophisticated wealth generator' is exactly what it sounds like. Banks in Jersey deal with wealthy people who are extremely savvy with their investments.  When you open an account on the high street you may be offered maybe 5 different ways to invest your money. That money is then taken off you and will be put into a huge pot that'll be invested in one or several of hundred of different types of investment.
Savvy customers demand access to more choice than a high street customer will ever know exists. Wealth management banks in Jersey can provide the access and give expert advice as well.  It's infinitely more complicated than most people would realise. It's also the people in the know who have genorating the wealth becuase of it.

Offline danrok

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #41 on: September 24, 2009, 02:00:20 PM »
That still doesn't explain the need for RBS, HSBC, et al, to have branches located off-shore, and not just in Jersey.

I spent many years designing and coding software for a UK stockbroker with approx. 200,000 active customers.  So, of course I needed to understand how each financial product works in fine detail, e.g. an ISA.  They didn't have any products which could be described as sophisticated wealth generators, nor did they have an off-shore branch, but they do have highly competent staff.

Also, there's no shortage of private banks, and the like in the City of London, with staff just as competent as any Jersey bank staff.  In fact, many, if not all, senior bankers and directors in Jersey, are not from Jersey, anyhow.

So, the question remains as to why these banks and services need to be located in Jersey, Guernsey, IOM, etc.

And, the only apparent jargon free answer I am aware of is the difference in taxation and secrecy.

Offline cpcarrot

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #42 on: September 24, 2009, 02:25:19 PM »
I would guess that Ashley’s point is that a great quality tailor doesn’t need to be located in Saville Row, regardless of where it was located it would still be a great tailor. However it won’t attract the same client base, or make the same amount of money as an equally good tailor located on Saville Row. Same holds true for a lot of these offshore finance centres that have built up a reputation in this field.

There are potential taxation benefits, but these aren’t as simple as using a branch in a particular jurisdiction as you have to look at the whole finance structure of whatever package has been made available to the client. In a lot of cases while the product may be “sold” in Jersey the money may never even hit a Jersey account and could be being transacted anywhere on the globe so Jersey’s taxation state makes very little difference. This is one of the reasons why it is down to the individual and not the bank to report the tax due, as it could be being delivered ultimately to any jurisdiction (America, UK, elsewhere in Europe etc).

Online Fritz

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2009, 07:37:17 PM »
I,m sure these banks ,"Tax", a percentage for their services. (At a lower rate than the governments).
It is not the individual seeking to maximise his investment by taking ,"Professional", advice and staying legal who is the root of the problem.
It is the ,"Whore", who solicits and provides the ,"Professional", service that the innocent may never have known existed.

Offline Dylan

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Re: is BBC Radio reporting fairly?
« Reply #44 on: September 26, 2009, 06:12:24 AM »
Let's just face up to the fact that banks have off-shore branches for one reason only.  It could not be any more obvious.

Just the same as trees washed out to sea, and they really do have to float alone! :D
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